Education Leader

Education Leader

BridgeValley sees a need and meets it...

  • In 2013, the State of West Virginia consolidated two community colleges to create a stronger, more comprehensive multi-campus community college for the Fayette, Kanawha, Cabell, Clay, Mason, Putnam, and Wayne county service region.
  • In 2014, the College unveiled the Advanced Technology Center – Toyota Hall. This Center plays an essential role in the region by providing the latest technologies, programs, and expertise to support on-going economic development efforts. West Virginia can create the workforce industry needs by focusing on job creation; fostering economic development; and encouraging more students to enter Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers.
  • In 2014, the College launched its first 100 percent online program – Healthcare Management. Healthcare management is a growing field that is undergoing significant change. The career path is quite diverse due to the rapidly evolving industry. Technology has exploded in the last 10 years producing new options for treatment. This has led to growth in the management sector of the healthcare industry.
  • In 2015, the College welcomed its first Sonography class. Sonography is a dynamic profession that has grown significantly over the past 20 years. With rapidly developing new technologies and increased use of diagnostic ultrasound procedures, growth is projected to continue in the future with employment opportunities for qualified sonographers in both rural and urban
  • areas nationwide.
  • In 2019, the DHHR awarded the College $40,000 to support a Collegiate Recovery Program. A Collegiate Recovery Community offers support to students who are in recovery from any kind of addiction and/or mental illness including but not limited to, substance use, eating disorders, sex addiction, or depression.
  • In 2019, the College raised $3,000 to establish an on-campus food pantry. A 2016 Students Against Hunger survey found that 22 percent of students had very low food security, meaning they were often experiencing hunger. Twenty percent of students at four-year universities reported being hungry, while the rate rose to 25 percent at community colleges.